References

Mathematical-Physical Salon in Zwinger
Dresden, Germany
Owner: Staatsbetrieb Sächsisches Immobilien- und Baumanagement (SIB), Dresden (DE)
Architect: Exhibition: Holzer Kobler Architekturen GmbH, Zürich (CH); Building: Büro Lungwitz, Dresden (DE)
Lighting design: Lichtvision Design & Engineering GmbH, Berlin (DE)
Electrical consultants: Elektro Ing-Plan GmbH, Dresden (DE)
Electrical installations: Elektro Dresden West, Dresden (DE)
After a six year renovation, the Mathematical Physical Salon in Dresden’s Zwinger, reopened to the public in April 2013. The experiment gallery of Saxon’s electoral prince was founded in 1728 and today is the oldest museum within the building complex. The new exhibit design by Holzer Kobler emphasises the architecture of the baroque building and offers nearly twice as much space for the fascinating collection of the historical scientific instruments.

Large exhibit pieces are presented free-standing, while small and especially sensitive objects are protected in glass showcases. In view of this, the lighting solution plays an important role: it accompanies the visitor through the galleries and pavilions, facilitates orientation and also highlights the objects in a targeted and gentle manner, allowing them to be experienced authentically.

A significant change within the scope of the renovation was the decision to use a 100-percent LED lighting solution. The minimalistic LED SUPERSYSTEM spots are integrated discreetly and feature low power consumption and outstanding light quality. The fact that the new generation of LED luminaires emits less heat and their light is virtually free of IR and UV radiation fulfils the stringent conservational requirements of the museum. Excellent colour rendering of more than Ra 90 allows visitors to experience the natural materials and colours of the exhibit pieces. Based on specific lighting requirements SUPERSYSTEM was installed in all of the exhibit rooms and in the public areas as flushmounted or surface-mounted ceiling luminaires or as pendant luminaires.

A further characteristic element of the new lighting solution is the interplay of daylight and artificial light. Thanks to the integrated DALI unit, SUPERSYSTEM is compatible with diverse lighting management systems. The spotlights can therefore be controlled in groups for adjustment to the prevailing light situation and to the ideal luminous intensity for the particular exhibit constellations.

Zumtobel. The Light.

Lighting solution
Museo Jumex
Mexiko City, Mexiko
Owner: Eugenio Lopez, Mexico City (MX)
Architect: David Chipperfield Architects, London (UK)
Lighting design: Arup, London (UK)
Execution planning: TAAU –Taller Abierto de Arquitectura y Urbanismo, Mexico City (MX)
David Chipperfield is a long accepted member of the architecture elite. His unique approach to space, material and light allows him to create buildings with special clarity and tranquillity. Since the New Museum Berlin, his most extensive project so far, the Briton is regarded worldwide as a specialist for complex museum buildings. For the important art collection Jumex, Chipperfield has now completed a museum in Mexico City that offers a convincing combination of flowing spaces and skilful lighting.

Exquisite Wrapping for Art
Formally, the building is reminiscent of industrial halls such as those that can be seen in Ecatapec on the outskirts of the city. That is where the private collection – considered the greatest contemporary art in Latin America, with works by Jeff Koons, Andreas Gursky and Gabriel Orozco – was previously on exhibit in a hall on the company premises. While the majority of the administration and the depot remained there, Chipperfield’s building in the city centre serves as a new satellite with an exhibit area of 4,000 square metres.

The spatial separation of the two functional areas enhances the museum’s concept, in which flexibility plays a central role: a substantially streamlined administration area is located in the underground level of the four-storey building together with the temporary storage and operational areas. All of the other levels are therefore entirely free for exhibition activities. The pleasant climatic conditions in Mexico City are reflected especially in the open character of the ground floor: outdoors and indoors blend together here, because the building was erected on a column structure that allows visitors to enter from all sides. Extensive glass surfaces and large wooden portals that define the entrance open the view onto the surroundings.

The lighting concept follows David Chipperfield’s feeling for the precise mixture of natural and artificial light. The visitor’s glance is selectively guided outwards while the light sources on all floors carefully focus on the exhibition areas. The museum’s flexible spatial concept presented a special challenge with respect to the planning and implementation of an ideal light design. In close cooperation with planning teams from Arup and Zumtobel, the Chipperfield staff created specific lighting scenarios for diverse exhibition situations. The goal was to configure a system that was efficient and easy to operate in-keeping with the simple character of the building.

The focus on the ground floor and the 1st floor is therefore on variable general lighting. Designed for events, conferences and workshops, these two storeys are illuminated by special ARCOS recessed ceiling luminaires. They not only allow, a discreet, homogeneous installation, but also specific illumination of single areas. If there is a need for illumination of temporary exhibits or three-dimensional objects such as sculptures, LED downlights can be substituted for the ARCOS luminaires.

LED spotlight ARCOS
The two upper floors are designed entirely as exhibition areas and are accordingly equipped with lighting technology. With a room height of five metres, the second upper floor can be divided by partition walls. Daylight enters the room through a north facing window with access to the terrace, and textile curtains provide anti-glare protection while allowing an outside view. This level is additionally illuminated by a track system mounted in the ceiling that can be adapted to every conceivable exhibition requirement. Adjustable spots can be regulated to provide both basic and accent lighting.

ARCOS boasts technical features developed especially for this application: David Chipperfield designed the extremely compact spotlight for Zumtobel in 2008 and revised it in 2013. The architect contributed his extensive experience in building museums to the development of a technologically innovative design luminaire for the most stringent conservational requirements. Testing of the luminaires in the room was especially important to him. Also at the focus: the perspective of the user, which Chipperfield also included.

Cooperative design process
With the Jumex project, Zumtobel and David Chipperfield resumed the cooperative design process for several individual solutions: For the two exhibition levels the luminaire development team designed special features for ARCOS, including an extended arm, single sockets and LED versions with excellent colour rendering (Ra90) and a colour temperature of 4,000 K. They are also used in the 3rd upper floor for accent lighting. A continuous row lighting system provides for even illumination of the floor – because the complex roof geometry requires a detailed scenario for the interplay of natural and artificial light. Daylight enters this level through skylights in the sawtooth-like jags. The light is scattered by means of a multi-layer system of matte glass and semitransparent acrylic and is admitted into the room through matte white blinds.

At night and in the case of reduced light intensity, the ZX2 continuous row lighting system installed in the skylights and the configured ARCOS spotlights, with special lenses and filters, ensure optimal light quality for homogeneous illumination of the exhibits. The flexibility of the configuration here also allows alteration and division of the spatial dramaturgy of the total of 860 square metres, with no loss of the sense of spaciousness. Additional continuous row luminaires are installed for added, accented illumination of single objects in the room. Control of the respective luminaires in the gallery and office rooms is achieved by means of the lighting management system LUXMATE BASIC.

Zumtobel. The Light.

Lighting solution
Kunstkammer Vienna
Vienna, Austria
Owner: Vienna Art History Museum, Vienna (AT)
Architect: HG Merz, Stuttgart, Berlin (DE)
Lighting design: Die Lichtplaner, Limburg (DE), Symetrys, Lustenau (AT)
Electrical installations: IB Süd, Vienna (AT)
After having been closed for more than 10 years, the Kunstkammer was again opened to the public in March 2013, with the aim of making the history of the Habsburg collection and its most important figureheads known to an interested public of today. The highest conservational requirements, content-related didactic criteria, but also emotional and aesthetic factors played an equally essential role for the new presentation of this cabinet of curiosities. Yet, the approx. 2000 exhibits could not be more different in nature: among the highlights are outstanding works of the goldsmith’s art, such as the famous Saliera by Benvenuto Cellini, first-rate specimens of sculpture, such as the Krumau Madonna, masterly bronze statuettes, delicate ivory items, but also precious clocks, games and scientific instruments.

Zumtobel has developed a customised LED lighting solution in order to obtain highly differentiated, gentle and effective illumination of the various objects on display. At the heart of the lighting solution is the Starbrick, a Zumtobel Masterpiece developed in collaboration with Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson. Boasting unpretentious elegance and multi-functionality, the Starbrick is the only representative of contemporary art and cutting-edge technology in these rooms of the museum that were opened for the first time in 1891. The installation includes a total of 51 Starbrick assemblies consisting of four modules each, especially designed for illuminating the unique and sensitive works of art. Additional direct light is ensured by integrated Supersystem spotlights and indirect light is provided by a Panos Infinity module, while one of the Starbrick's surfaces that is directed downwards doubles as emergency lighting.

In addition to LED Supersystem spotlights mounted on the walls, individual Supersystem spotlights were also installed in the showcases. Especially in the showcases, each of them a highly sensitive closed system, the benefits of LED technology can be fully exploited. Thus, light-emitting diodes not only boast a long service life and high energy efficiency, combined with reduced maintenance cost, but also ensure effective and at the same time gentle presentation of the exhibits. Moreover, the light colours can be individually matched to the colours and materials of the exhibits, so that the latter can unfurl their full charm and allow visitors to experience them authentically.


Dr. Sabine Haag   “We wanted to show this unique collection in the right light, literally.”
Dr. Sabine Haag, director of the Vienna Museum of Art History

The Museum is a walk-in synthesis of the arts in itself, enhanced by a unique and multifaceted art collection that adds to the success and fascination of the Kunstkammer Wien. With respect to the new presentation, the main challenge was to create a contemporary lighting design that remains in the background and lets the exhibits take centre stage.

Hence, a collection that had not been open to the public for eleven years can now be experienced in all its modernness, multifacetedness and absolute quality. The intelligent integration of daylight results in softly modulated light, so that the collection is presented in a different lighting scene in summer than in winter, and visitors will perceive it differently in the morning light than in the evening.

“The atmosphere conveyed by the 16th century exhibits finds its continuation in the Starbrick chandeliers.”

As functionality was a prerequisite for installation of the chandeliers, the Starbrick had to be modified for the actual room situation, in collaboration with Olafur Eliasson. Of course, Ms Haag and her team were fully aware of the risk to polarise when integrating a contemporary element into a historical artwork complex. But after all, the Starbrick reflects many developments that the exhibits have already gone through. Like the 16th century exhibits, it represents a combination of cutting-edge technology, art, absolute perfection and an attractive appearance, not least because its crystalline shape is also found in many exhibits. Therefore, at a room height of six metres, a second level of artworks was created, but in contrast to the exhibits, these artworks do fulfil a function, too.

“It was clear to us that in order to present the best collection, we wanted to collaborate only with the best partners as well.”

Obviously, sustainable preservation of the exhibits had been given top priority. Against this background, the decision in favour of gentle and authentic LED lighting was a matter of course. Beside the ambition of creating an innovative and future-oriented solution able to llast for decades, in contrast to a temporary exhibition, collaboration in this project was above all characterised by unwavering trust in the partners' skills and their commitment to quality without any compromises.


HG Merz   “This collection is one of the most important things I will exhibit in the course of my career.”
HG Merz, architect and museum designer

With the technical aspects covered by scientists and engineers, it is important for HG Merz to consider things from the visitors' point of view as well when designing such an exhibition. He welcomes the opportunities arising from the new media, so that the stories behind the exhibits can be told, the exhibition thus becoming accessible at several levels.

“The magic of these rooms, which are outstanding in terms of architecture, is highly dependent on light.”

He puts himself in the visitors' shoes also when it comes to lighting. Lighting design is a decisive factor in maintaining the magic of the exhibits and the rooms. Hence, a variety of lighting scenes are used, taking into account the existing architecture of the Kunstkammer and emphasising its expressive ceiling design, colours and materials, on the one hand, and setting the exhibits themselves centre-stage, on the other hand. Beside the layout of the rooms, which had originally not been used as a classic cabinet of curiosities, and their furniture, the biggest challenge was the multitude and heterogeneity of the exhibits.

“Light should be visible.”

While the focus with respect to the lighting solution developed for the exhibition showcases was primarily on remaining unobtrusive, the requirements for a chandelier comprised far more aspects. It should not only bring light to a room, but serve other purposes as well. The Starbrick by Eliasson has made it possible to integrate a work of art that meets all requirements and at the same time adds another, more contemporary feel to the rooms.

Franz Kirchweger   “The success of this project results from the high willingness displayed by all those involved to approach one another and make compromises in order to bring out the best as a team.”
Dr. Franz Kirchweger, curator of the Vienna Museum of Art History

The new presentation of the Kunstkammer involved a certain amount of tension, since the historical 19th century building had never really been adapted to the requirements of a modern museum, so that a number of adjustments to the building's structure were required. Moreover, the presentation was to equally meet scientific, conservational and aesthetic requirements and nevertheless cast a spell over visitors. In collaboration with HG Merz, an exhibition concept was developed that takes historical architecture into account, but also creates new accents and thematic priorities in terms of content, so that visitors will be able to see the valuable exhibits from a different angle.

“Artificial lighting is to enable visitors to experience the exhibits as authentically as possible: wood that looks like wood, a piece of rock crystal that does not just look like glass, but is resplendent in all its multifacetedness.”

The aim to stick to the original idea of the building as a daylight-based museum raised a number of lighting design issues. Moreover, the building's architecture with its high ceilings and very spacious halls required an innovative approach to create a pleasant and inviting atmosphere. Thanks to installation of the chandeliers, general room lighting could be achieved that serves as high-quality functional lighting as well. In particular the sculptures, which due to their three-dimensional quality present completely other challenges to the lighting system than paintings, benefit from these conditions.

During the design stage, when a decision had to be made regarding the light sources, it was already foreseeable that very good results could be achieved with LEDs. Thanks to the technological progress made in the past years, the results even exceed any expectations: the materials and colours of the exhibits can be authentically experienced and are enhanced to optimum extent; at the same time, the LEDs meet all requirements in terms of conservation and sustainability.

Olafur Eliasson   “Throughout the history of art, existing laws and the creation of reality have been questioned many a time – this is why the Starbrick fits perfectly into the Kunstkammer.”
Olafur Eliasson

Art and industrial design have more in common than you would think. Art is a language the ambition and quality of which depend on the things expressed with it. For Eliasson, industrial design is above all a method to make an artistic statement. The Starbrick is a work of art that is detached from the elitist standing of art and definitely more accessible via the principle of reproduction. As a system assembled from individual modules, the Starbrick is an artwork that will never be finished and can always be formed into new shapes. Hence, the Starbrick is an element that can be combined and added, but also a luminaire that is part of a bigger ensemble. For the chandeliers installed in the Kunstkammer in Vienna, the Starbrick's lighting intensity level was slightly increased due to the high ceilings, but their shape has remained unchanged. In accordance with the historical premises, a highly individual Starbrick configuration has been created.

About the Starbrick
Four individual works of lighting art, the Masterpieces, have been created in close collaboration between Zumtobel and international architects, designers and artists. The Starbrick is a versatile lighting module. Its basic structure is a cube, on whose six surfaces additional cubes have been placed at an angle of 45°. These additional cubes serve as connectors to combine several Starbrick modules.

» More about Starbrick

Zumtobel. The Light

Lighting solution
EYE Film Instituut Nederland
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Owner: EYE Film Instituut Nederland, Amsterdam (NL)
Architect: Delugan Meissl Associated Architecs, Wien (AT)
Lighting design: Arena: Die Lichtplaner, Limburg (DE) in collaboration with Symetrys, Lustenau (AT)
Since 5 April 2012, EYE, the only museum in the Netherlands that is exclusively dedicated to film and the moving image, has been located at its new home directly on the waterfront along the homonymous river IJ, right across Centraal Station. Owing to its exposed position, it is visible from afar. The gleaming white shell that covers its angular structure makes the building stand out from the cityscape like no other, also thanks to the dynamic design language used by the Vienna-based architectural studio of Delugan Meissl Associated Architects in charge of the building project. The architects started from the assumption that film is an illusion based on moving lights. This principle was translated into architecture, so that the building itself has become a kind of screen in its own right, showing a film the protagonists of which are the light, the city and the landscape of Amsterdam.

Another special feature of the building is the arena covering 1,200 square metres that welcomes visitors who enter the futuristic building. Predominantly lined with wooden panelling and fitted with high-quality oak parquet flooring, the arena boasts an open, warm and pleasant atmosphere as well as a direct view across the river and the city. Visitors are welcomed by a pleasant ambience inviting them to stay for a while in the coffee bar, restaurant or bar to get in the mood for the show. Usually, it doesn't take long before the many seat cushions placed on the terraced stairs are occupied, where guests can enjoy a wonderful view of Amsterdam. “The spatial centerpiece of the building, the “arena”, invites visitors of the museum to stay for a while. The room's unique geometry promotes social interaction to a great extent”, Roman Delugan points out. The STARBRICK installation contributes significantly to this effect. STARBRICK is a Zumtobel Masterpiece, a collection of exclusive works of lighting art which the luminaire manufacturer has developed together with renowned partners. The highly versatile lighting module was made by artist Olafur Eliasson in collaboration with Zumtobel. “The STARBRICK is a space-generating lighting module. Developing it together with Zumtobel we were able to create it for everyday use and living. I’m very excited to see it integrated into a public institution. The expandable system behind the geometric design enables the STARBRICKs to grow in all directions. For the new EYE museum foyer, the bricks form luminous cloud-like structures that conjure up the atmosphere of a cinema – stars for the stars”, explains artist Olafur Eliasson.

Zumtobel. The Light.

Military History Museum
Dresden, Germany
Owner: Staatsbetrieb Sächs. Immobilien- und Baumanagement, Dresden (D)
Architect: Studio Daniel Libeskind AG, Zurich/CH
Lighting design: DELUX AG, Zurich (CH)
Electrical consultants: IPRO Dresden, Dresden (DE); INNIUS GTD, Dresden (DE)
Electrical installations: Elektro Dresden West, Dresden (DE); FAE Elektrotechnik GmbH & Co, KG, Heidenau (DE)
With an exhibition area of 13,000 m2, the Military Museum is the largest military history museum in Germany, providing a compelling retrospective of more than 100 years of chequered history. The atmospheric impression that the rooms make on visitors results from the special lighting design which Zumtobel developed in cooperation with Daniel Libeskind. The star architect sees light as a design tool and his sensitive understanding of light it is very evident here. The wide variety of exhibits and materials demanded a flexible lighting design. Sumptuous uniforms, military equipment, small arms and weapons and even evacuation plans – each individual item needed to be shown in a particular light. Ambient lighting and accent lighting merge into each other in a manner that seems completely natural. The spotlights used for the ambient lighting brighten up items that are intended to attract the onlooker's attention and punctuate those areas where detailed visual scrutiny is required. This versatility is provided by Zumtobel's ARCOS spotlight system which was specially developed to meet needs in art and culture application areas. The extensive product range offers a suitable product solution for each and every lighting design task. Spotlights can be positioned flexibly on the TECTON trunking system. This 11-pole trunking makes it possible to cater flexibly for the various room lengths and exhibition concepts that are encountered in the museum.

Emergency lighting remains invisible during the day-to-day operation of the museum because the ultra-modern RESCLITE LED luminaires are seamlessly integrated with the TECTON trunking system. These efficient LED luminaires have a recognition range of 16 m and ensure safe guidance in the event of an emergency.

Special optical fibre lighting outlets with different beam patterns and UV/IR blocking filters were used to illuminate the display cabinets. A STARFLEX light engine with a 100 W QR-CB halogen lamp with a dichroic glass reflector for optimum injection of light was fitted in line with the customer's requirements. Zumtobel's LINARIA batten luminaire is used to light the special table showcases. Installed flush with the top on the rear wall, this narrow light line does not interfere with the showcase's visual look and illuminates its interior uniformly and pleasantly.

Zumtobel. The Light.

Lighting solution
Städel Museum
Frankfurt on the Main, Germany
Owner: Städelsches Kunstinstitut, Frankfurt (DE)
Architect: schneider+schumacher, Frankfurt (DE)
Lighting design: Licht Kunst Licht AG, Bonn/Berlin (DE)
Electrical consultants: Delta-Tech, Weiterstadt (DE)
Electrical installations: Imtech, Rüsselsheim (DE)
From the outset, the lighting concept was crucially important for the subterranean extension to the Städel Museum in Frankfurt on the Main. Zumtobel implemented a tailor-made custom lighting solution in collaboration with architects from schneider+schumacher and lighting de-signers from LichtKunstLicht. This solution meets the very highest requirements from a con-servator's viewpoint and ensures that light is an integral part of the architecture.

The new extension of the Städel Museum provides approximately 3,000 m2 of exhibition space underneath the garden of the existing building. The hall is up to 8.20 m high and is spanned by an elegantly curved, seemingly weightless ceiling. Although it is an underground structure, the new extension is apparent on the surface, too. Visitors can walk around in the museum's slightly domed garden, which is now covered by a remarkable pattern of circular skylights illu-minating the new museum space.

These 195 skylights with diameters of 1.5 to 2.5 m form openings in the self-supporting, slightly domed ceiling of the subterranean hall. They allow daylight to enter the exhibition space below and are also used as a source of artificial lighting with a ring of LED elements that is fitted with warm (2700 K) and cool white (5000 K) LEDs– a custom solution developed by Zumtobel in collaboration with LichtKunstLicht lighting designers and schnei-der+schumacher architects. When it is cloudy, and in the evening and at night, these LEDs ensure that paintings and exhibits are uniformly illuminated.

Thanks to Zumtobel's tailor-made lighting solution, highly sensitive exhibits such as works on paper, for instance, can be displayed directly alongside room partitions where sculptures are illuminated. Illuminance levels can be individually adapted for each skylight as needed. Cus-tom-built Arcos LED projection spotlights with various optics can be plugged into sockets in the skylights in order to emphasise individual objects or pick out wall surfaces as required.

The client opted to use Zumtobel'sLuxmate Professional lighting control range to ensure ra-tional use of daylight: the lighting management system controls the use of artificial lighting from the skylights depending on the amount of available daylight and the required or maximum lighting levels, according to specifications, for the exhibits that are on display.

Zumtobel. The Light.

 

Staedel   “What is required for a project to succeed is undisturbed and challenging communication be-tween manufacturer and designer that can sometimes even become passionate on a matter. The outstanding result shows how good this has worked for us."
Andreas Schulz, Managing Director, Licht Kunst Licht
 
Schumacher   “The way we designed the building, we made sure that all benefits the Städel ensemble had before would be maintained. In addition, the new rooms are spectacularly visible from the street thanks to the domed lawn and the skylights. From a technical point of view, sustainabil-ity is ensured by modern air-conditioning technology and above all the lighting system based on LED technology and a large daylight component.”
Michael Schumacher, Architect, schneider+schumacher
 
Staedel   “Our task was to find an integral lighting solution for the complex requirements, among others, to lighting quality, colour rendering and lighting based on conservational aspects. Our ability to develop custom solutions and the co-operative partnership with lighting designers and archi-tects enabled us to create this special LED lighting solution. By combining intelligent control with state-of-the-art LED technology we were able to develop an absolutely unique and flexible lighting concept that allows to provide the best light at any time for unlimited enjoyment of art.”
Reinhardt Wurzer, Head of International Projects, Zumtobel Lighting
Lighting solution
Festspielhaus Erl
Erl, Austria
Owner: Strabag, Lukas Lang GmbH, Vienna (AT)
Architect: Delugan Meissl Associated Architects, Vienna (AT)
the immediate vicinity of the Festival Theatre in Erl, which was established in 1957, the renowned architect team of Delugan Meissl has created a genuine gem. It is now the second stage for the Tyrolean summer festival productions in Erl and the only stage during the winter season. The clear architectural language of the new building takes special advantage of the surrounding landscape. In the summer, the dark façade blends in discreetly with the forested Tyrolean mountainscape. In the winter, when the bright Passion Play Theatre merges with the snowy landscape, the dark building is the star. Such a gem of a building, with a usable area of 7,000 m2 and more than 862 seats, demands an integral, innovative lighting concept that harmonises with the unusual form of the building – such as the distinctive accentuation of the wedge-shaped niches on the side walls of the large hall.

Some 400 LED spotlights create a festive atmosphere inside the Festival Theatre. For the wall lighting and brilliant accentuation of the art exhibits in the foyer, the LED spotlight IYON is used, which was developed in an earlier cooperation between Delugan Meissl and Zumtobel.

Zumtobel. The Light.

Lighting solution
Museo del Novecento
Milan, Italy
Owner: Comune di Milano, Milan (IT)
Architect: Italo Rota, Fabio Fornasari, Milan (IT)
Lighting design: Allessandro Perdetti, Mailand (IT)
Electrical installations: Cooperativa Cellini Impianti Tecnologici, Prato (IT)
Photos: Jürgen Eheim
Competition and construction documentation: Gruppo Rota: Italo Rota, Fabio Fornasari, Emmanuele Auxilia, Paolo Montanari
Shining from inside

For a long time, the Palazzo dell’Arengario near Milan Cathedral lead a miserable existence. After being converted into the museum of 20th century Italian art, it now shines in new splendour. The austere building from the 1930s was turned into a multi-faceted art museum. A tour of the collection, which comprises 400 works - from futurism up to Arte Povera -, is also a walk through the city's history: city views that are deliberately positioned like paintings resemble still lifes.

Although the facade has hardly been changed (only the bricked up round arched windows on the middle floor were glazed), the tower-like building seems like a transparent shell, as if backlit, allowing glimpses into its new interior. Behind the large glazed surfaces, Lucio Fontana's "Struttura al neon" lighting installation sends out rays of light onto the cathedral square.

To achieve this new openness, the building was mostly gutted. Now, a ramp spirals upwards leading visitors to the exhibition rooms. The glass facade surrounding the ramp offers insights and views that change with every step you take, like in a film sequence. Point-shaped luminaires track the curved surfaces on two levels: downlights recessed into the ceiling mark the way, illuminating the ramp's surface, while small LED spots on the balustrade irradiate blue/green light into the interior.

Light as a creative design tool also plays an important role at the interfaces of the various divisions of the museum. "Portals of light" mark the entrances to the exhibition rooms. In this context, wide-area lighting modules act as door frames emphasising the transitions to the more quiet gallery rooms. Here, the modular CIELOS luminous ceiling provides uniform, diffuse ambient lighting, leaving the leading part to the art objects. The CIELOS modules are arranged depending on the respective floor plans either as linear continuous rows or in a square; they are controlled via the central LUXMATE lighting management system. As opposed to the wide-area lighting of the ceilings in the galleries, the access areas are illuminated by vertical light lines installed flush in the walls.

Zumtobel. The Light.

Lighting solution
Vienna Museum of Technology
Vienna, Austria
Owner: Museum of Technology, Vienna (AT)
Lighting design: Pokorny Lichtarchitektur, Vienna (AT)
Electrical installations: Brüder Gros, Vienna (AT)
Efficient lighting solutions for technical exhibitions

The Vienna Museum of Technology is the only national museum in Austria which is devoted to the history of engineering and natural sciences. The entire lighting system in the Museum of Technology was upgraded as part of a project called “Light & Climate”. The museum’s installed load has been reduced by 70 % due to renovation.

The new lighting concept provides a combination of direct and indirect lighting designed to improve lighting quality in the museum. The indirect lighting is housed in architecturally sophisticated lighting channels and achieves 40–50 lux on the actual object illuminated. The lighting is dimmable. Additional accent lighting is provided by ARCOS spotlights fitted with 20 W or 35 W HIT lamps. Impressive energy savings were realised here compared with the previous lighting system, which used 100 W halogen spotlights.

A total of 1,400 ARCOS spotlights have been installed over the three floors of the Museum of Technology. One major advantage of the new lighting is that it produces less heat; this improves room climate conditions drastically, especially in summer.

Zumtobel. The Light.
Lighting solution
MAXXI
Rome, Italy
Owner: Italian Ministry of Culture, Rome (IT)
Architect: Zaha Hadid Architects, Zaha Hadid and Patrik Schumacher, London (GB)
Lighting design: Equation Lighting, London (GB)
Electrical installations: Electrical installations: Ciel Spa, Rome (IT)
Electrical consultants: Max Fordham and Partners, OK Design Group, London (GB)
Dynamic sculpture in space

The exposed concrete building of the Museo nazionale delle arti del XXI secolo - MAXXI - is like a sculpture featuring a multi-faceted interplay of light and shadow. The sunlight falling through incisions and apertures draws bright patterns, shadows travel over the wide forecourt, the inside and outside being interwoven in subtle ways. In the form of canopy roofs, the projecting building units guide the visitor into the lobby that extends over the entire height of the building. Intersecting stairways and bridges connect the five exhibition levels, a "vertical piazza" directs the flow of movements. Natural light floods into the building from the glazed roof to the floor, finely tuned by a specially developed luminous ceiling that incorporates indirect lighting from fluorescent lamps that can be switched on additionally as needed. This combined system provides for uniform ambient lighting. In addition to that, artificial lighting is used as a deliberate creative tool to dynamically highlight the routing system. Stairways and bridges are turned into "bearers of light". Their translucent, glittering undersides equipped with fluorescent lamps behind light-scattering film and acrylic glass seem like luminous display cases.

The spaciousness of the entrance hall is continued into the exhibition rooms. With straight, curved, tilted walls, with corridors, ramps and terraces, the sequence of rooms unfolds in a surprising and at the same time complex manner. The rooms run parallel with each other, they intersect, interlock, form cascade-like levels, meandering in various directions, just to meet again somewhere else. The lead in the lighting concept is played by natural light. In addition to that, complex luminous ceilings provide for natural rendering of colours and surfaces. All the technical components are integrated in the narrow roof girders (steel trusses clad with concrete elements): they carry the exterior grids serving for solar protection and the diffusion of light, as well as the two glass levels and the blinds. Uniform ambient lighting is ensured by the dimmable fluorescent lamps installed on both sides of the ribbed girders over their entire length, behind translucent acrylic glass scattering the light. The blinds and light output are controlled by the Luxmate Litenet lighting management system according to the position of the sun and depending on the lighting situation required. Additional spotlights for accent lighting, but also video projectors and light partitions can be installed on the trunking system integrated at the bottom of the girders.

Zumtobel. The Light.

Lighting solution
Museum M
Leuven, Belgium
Owner: Autonoom Gemeentebedrijf Museum, Leuven (BE)
Architect: Stéphane Beel Architecten, Ghent (BE)
Electrical consultants: RCR studiebureau, Herent (BE)
Electrical installations: Spie NV, Zaventem (BE)
Photos: Toon Grobet
In the labyrinth of art

Featuring a collection of 46,000 objects of medieval or contemporary art, the Museum M acts as a bridge between history and the present. "Centuries old and vitally alive" - the tenet of the city of Leuven also holds true for the new museum: the spacious complex has several entrances opening it towards the historical city centre; it combines different architectural styles and eras, presenting itself as lively, multi-faceted art district.

The former academy building and the Vander Kelen-Mertens Palais - both buildings were integrated into the Museum M - have been renovated carefully according to the rules of the preservation of monuments, and they were linked with the modern building via a bridge. A total of 6,500 square metres of exhibition area are spread over this labyrinth-like museum complex. While the colourful splendour of ages long past is perceptible in the ancient building, in relatively small rooms with wooden ceilings and wall panelling, the new building is all sober minimalism.

Instead of monotonous, isolated rooms, the architect has designed an extremely varied museum tour that may be used flexibly, with spacious, high rooms, and then again smaller, lower ones. The lighting concept pays tribute to the character of the individual rooms, responding with great sensitivity to their specific spatial characteristics. Thus, the officially protected art rooms of the existing buildings are illuminated by delicate SUPERSYSTEM tracks floating below the ancient wooden ceiling, suspended on almost invisible cords. Vertical wallwashers provide for flexible, expressive accent lighting of the objects on display, as required. For the general, compact and flexible lighting, 3-phase tracks with spotlights are used. In the clearly more spacious White-Cube rooms of the new building, TEMPURA spotlights incorporating LED technology have been installed on TECTON trunking. The spotlights’ colour temperature can be adjusted in the range of 2700 to 6500 Kelvin according to requirements. Moreover, by using LED light, any impairment of the art objects through IR or UV radiation can be avoided.

Zumtobel. The Light.

Lighting solution
Schloss Neuschwanstein
Füssen, Germany
Owner: Bavarian Administration of State-owned Palaces, Gardens and Lakes, Munich (DE)
Electrical installations: Ambos, Füssen (DE)
Royal lighting

King Louis II would have been delighted. The sovereign, who had always been very open-minded about innovative technologies, had a number of sensational technological advancements implemented during the construction of Schloss Neuschwanstein. With its new LED lighting system, Schloss Neuschwanstein has ventured a step into the twenty-first century. In this way the State Apartments are illuminated efficiently and, above all, gently. All areas open to the public are gradually going to be fitted with individual LED lighting solutions.

The greatest concern of those in charge is the heavy burden on historical furniture, textiles and paintings caused by UV and IR radiation. In order to not interfere with the historical room impression, visible light sources should be avoided to the greatest possible extent. Another requirement is that existing points of installation or clamping devices must be used in order to avoid any impairment of the historical structure.

The clients were particularly impressed by the compact dimensions and UV-free light of SUPERSYSTEM. Architecturally speaking, the LED lighting system is very discreet, while setting highly attractive accents - even from a greater distance. Owing to different optical attachments, the LED spotlights generate varying beam patterns with only 2.5 W. The magnificent colours in the cupola of the Throne Room are illuminated impressively by TEMPURA LED spotlights. By choosing colour temperatures between warm (3000 K) and cool light (6500 K), details can be emphasised to optimum effect, and those in charge at the museum can always modify the lighting according to requirements.

Zumtobel. The Light.

Lighting solution
HARPA Reykjavik
Reykjavik, Iceland
Architect: Henning Larsen Architects, Kopenhagen (DK)
Lighting design: Studio Olafur Eliasson, Berlin (DE)
Emotional and full of energy, like Iceland itself

The new Harpa Concert Hall rises up like a giant cut crystal in front of the jagged coast of Reykjavik harbour. The honeycomb elements of the façade make up a dazzling sea of multicoloured highlights. Refl ections on the water surface reinforce the association with a natural phenomenon, calling to mind mysterious northern lights. The sparkling Concert Hall and Conference Centre that now adorns the cosmopolitan capital of Iceland was designed by Henning Larsen Architects in cooperation with the Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson, who was responsible for the characteristic appearance of the outer envelope. The area in front of the building is bathed in mystical blue light emanating from hidden sources of light, transmitted inside the building through glass fi elds. Olafur Eliasson and Zumtobel developed a special new type of luminaire, the shape and colour of which permits almost invisible integration in the prism structure of the façade, lighting it up with LEDs. Inside the crystalline outer envelope, visitors can expect to experience music in a new dimension. The large three-tiered concert hall with a blazing red interior is named after one of Iceland’s most beautiful volcanoes “Eldborg”, meaning “Fire Castle”.

Zumtobel. The Light.

Lighting Solution

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